Click here for a full resolution image of Pickering's Triangle (2.63 MB)

 

 

The Details
Object
NGC 6979 Pickering's Triangle portion of the Veil Nebula in Cygnus
Optics
Astro-Physics 160 EDF Refractor at f/5.7
Platform
Astro-Physics 1200 GTO
Camera
SBIG STL-11000M
Filters
Tru-Balance 6nm Hydrogen-alpha filter
Date
10 October 2006
Location
Mount Wilson Observatory - Mount Wilson, CA
Exposure
Ha 8 x 1800 sec 1x1 bin
Software
Maxim DL/CCD, Registar, Photoshop CS2
Orientation
Field of View: 02°11’ x 01°27’ centered on RA 20h49m13s
DEC 31°18’07” (2000.0). North angle 58.6 °; east 90° CCW from north
Notes

Pickering’s Triangle was discovered in 1904 by Williamina Fleming of the Harvard Observatory while examining photographic plates of the area. The object was named in honor of her boss, astronomer Edward Charles Pickering, then director of the Observatory. Pickering’s Triangle goes by a number of aliases, including Pickering’s Wedge, Fleming’s Triangular Wisp, and Simeis 3-188. Current estimates place this supernova remnant at about 1800 light years from Earth. The entire Veil Nebula complex, of which Pickering’s Triangle is but a portion has an apparent diameter of about 3° or nine full moons! The tangled mass of star ejecta in the main body of the Triangle along with the fine, twisted filaments trailing out from that region make this object a beautiful and rewarding target for amateur astro-imagers.

 

 

 

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No reproduction of these images are permitted without prior approval of the author.